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Title Details:
The study of the Heavens
Other Titles: Philosophy and science in ancient Greece
Authors: Kalfas, Vassilis
Subject: NATURAL SCIENCES AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES > ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS > INTERDISCIPLINARY ASTRONOMY > PHILOSOPHY OF ASTRONOMY
HUMANITIES AND ARTS > PHILOSOPHY > PHILOSOPHICAL DISCIPLINES (EXCEPT ETHICS) > EPISTEMOLOGY
HUMANITIES AND ARTS > PHILOSOPHY > HISTORY OF WESTERN PHILOSOPHY > ANCIENT GREEK PHILOSOPHY
HUMANITIES AND ARTS > PHILOSOPHY > HISTORY OF WESTERN PHILOSOPHY > ANCIENT GREEK PHILOSOPHY > CLASSICAL GREEK PHILOSOPHY > ARISTOTLE
HUMANITIES AND ARTS > PHILOSOPHY > HISTORY OF WESTERN PHILOSOPHY > ANCIENT GREEK PHILOSOPHY > CLASSICAL GREEK PHILOSOPHY > PLATO
MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE > MATHEMATICS > HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY > HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS AND MATHEMATICIANS
Keywords:
Greek philosophy
Greek science
Astronomy
Plato
Aristotle
Late antiquity
Description:
Abstract:
This e-textbook consists of twelve studies that focus on the study of the Heavens by philosophers and mathematicians during Greek antiquity. The historical period they cover is extensive, from the 4th century BC until the end of Greek antiquity. Their ambition is to bring to light circumstances, in which tension is manifested between the branches of knowledge, and the importance of the demarcation of science and philosophy emerges. The way the issues are raised at these critical junctures, the "questions" that arise and the solutions that are given are enlightening for the understanding of ancient Greek thought. The book can be divided into two parts. The first part refers to the way in which Plato and Aristotle dealt with the phenomena of the heavens - mainly in their works Timaeus and De Caelo respectively. Plato connected philosophy with mathematics and considered astronomy a useful mathematical science for philosophy. Aristotle instead tried to separate the philosophical approach to ουρανός from the mathematical one. The second part examines the corresponding problems in the years of the great development of Greek science, that is, in the Hellenistic and the Roman period. The phenomena of the Heavens primarily concern astronomers, proposing bold and effective mathematical theories, but they are also a field of serious reflection for natural philosophers. Both seek to "save the phenomena", but they do so in a different way and with a different method. This controversy persists until the time of Copernicus.
Linguistic Editors: Spiliopoulos, Lampros
Graphic Editors: Spiliopoulos, Lampros
Type: Undergraduate textbook
Creation Date: 09-10-2022
Item Details:
ISBN 978-618-5667-70-2
License: Attribution - NonCommercial - ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.57713/kallipos-138
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/11419/8664
Bibliographic Reference: Kalfas, V. (2022). The study of the Heavens [Undergraduate textbook]. Kallipos, Open Academic Editions. https://dx.doi.org/10.57713/kallipos-138
Language: Greek
Consists of:
1. An interpretation of Plato’s Timaeus
2. Platonic astronomy
3. The astronomical significance of Plato’s myth of Er
4. Teleology in Plato and Aristotle
5. An introduction to Aristotle’s De caelo
6. Aristotle’s “theology”
7. Aristotle among civilizations
8. “Saving the appearances” in Greek science
9. The method of the physicist and the method of the astronomer
10. Claudius Ptolemy's method
11. Science and mythology in Greek astrology
12. The role of ideology in the Copernican Revolution
Publication Origin: Kallipos, Open Academic Editions